What is Vitamin D3?

Vitamin D is a group of fat-soluble secosteroids that are responsible for increasing intestinal absorption of calcium, magnesium and phosphate. The most important compound in this group is Vitamin D3, which is known as Cholecalciferol.

Vitamin D3 is vital for the body as it regulates the calcium and phosphorus levels in your blood. You need these in order to have healthy bones and a strong immune system. 

It has also been proven through clinical trials that strong levels of Vitamin D can also boost weight loss. In one study, subjects taking Vitamin D supplements were able to lose more weight than other subjects taking a placebo. The scientist behind this study claimed that the extra calcium and Vitamin D suppressed the subject’s appetite. 

How Does Your Body Absorb Vitamin D?

The Human Body is able to absorb vitamin D through the small intestine. This is the most common route of absorption for most minerals. Vitamin D is then taken to the liver via the bloodstream and becomes 25(OH)D. This is also known as Calcidiol, and is the primary form of circulating vitamin D. Few foods contain Vitamin D naturally, therefore food manufacturers have created fortified foods. These contain enhanced levels of the vitamin – an example of these foods are cereals and dairy products. 

Foods that contain naturally higher levels of Vitamin D include salmon, egg yolk, prawns and sardines.

Your body can also create Vitamin D to help regulate the body. This is considered to be a hormone. Vitamin D falls under the category of a steroid hormone. The liver and kidneys produce it, and it originates from the skin. 

When the hits your skin, UVB, an ultraviolet wave the sun emits, triggers a biochemical reaction. This then initiates the production of Vitamin D. Cholesterol is the precursor in this process and is in the skin. It becomes 7-Dehydro-cholesterol. When exposed UVB radiation, this is transformed to Cholecalciferol (Vitamin D3). At this stage, it follows the same process as the food source and the liver and kidneys metabolize it. 

What is Vitamin K2?

Vitamin K2 belongs to the K Vitamin family, which are essential for the body to produce prothrombin. This is a protein that promotes blood clotting and regulates bone metabolism. Research on Vitamin K2 also shows that it may prevent calcium buildup in the arteries, thus preventing risk to cardiovascular diseases

You can find K2, or menaquinone, in small quantities in organ meats and fermented foods. Importantly, the gut bacteria also produces Vitamin K2 as a byproduct of their metabolism.

Similar to Vitamin D3, Vitamin K2 is a fat-soluble vitamin, which gains entry to the blood via the lymph channels in the intestinal wall. Carrier proteins escort much of this vitamin.

How Do Vitamin D3 and K2 Work Together?

Vitamin D3 and K2 are essential for the regulation of calcium. Vitamin D3 and K2 ensure that calcium is absorbed easily and it reaches the bone mass, whilst preventing calcification of the arteries. Specifically, D3 allows the absorption of calcium and K2 activates a protein called osteocalcin, which integrates the calcium into the bones.

For reduced calcium plaques in the arteries, Vitamin K2 activates matrix GLA protein (MGP) to bind excess calcium which promotes arterial flexibility and total flow.

Summary

Vitamin D is a group of fat-soluble secosteroids that are responsible for increasing intestinal absorption of calcium, magnesium and phosphate.

Vitamin D3 is vital for the body as it regulates the calcium and phosphorus levels in your blood. You need these in order to have healthy bones and a strong immune system.

Vitamin K2 belongs to the K Vitamin family which are essential for the body to produce prothrombin, a protein that promotes blood clotting and regulates bone metabolism.

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